General Information About Hormone Pellet Therapy

Bioidentical hormone replacement therapy is the most convenient and effective method of hormone replacement available. Bioidentical hormone therapy has been documented in medical journal since 1935. It involves the simple and painless insertion of hormone pellets under the skin. Once the pellets are inserted male and female hormones will enter in blood stream whenever the body needs it. This gives the body the ability to control the release of hormones such as it did when the ovaries and testicles were working normally.

What is Bioidentical Hormone therapy?

Bioidentical hormone replacement therapy is the most convenient and effective method of hormone replacement available. Bioidentical hormone therapy has been documented in medical journal since 1935. It involves the simple and painless insertion of hormone pellets under the skin. Once the pellets are inserted male and female hormones will enter in blood stream whenever the body needs it. This gives the body the ability to control the release of hormones such as it did when the ovaries and testicles were working normally.

Are there any side effects or complications?

Side effects are very rare. Women may experience transient breast tenderness lasting seven to ten days from the time of first insertion, but rarely with repeat treatments. The growth of facial hair is rare and occurs no more frequently than what happens in post- menopausal women on no hormones.

The side effects in male are also rare, but may include decreased sperm count and testicular mass and possible prostate enlargement. These side effects occur more frequently with the use of synthetic hormone replacement therapy.

How do I get started?

First schedule an appointment with Dr. Sani. You will have a blood test to determine your hormone levels. The doctor will evaluate the result of your blood tests with you and prescribe the right amount of hormone for your unique needs. The pellet insertion procedure will then be scheduled and performed.

What is the procedure like?

A mild local anesthetic is used and each hormone pellet is inserted painlessly under the skin, typically in the hip area. The procedure will take less than five minutes. Once the pellets are inserted, a steady, low dose amount of natural hormone flows directly into the blood stream balancing your hormone levels.

What are bioidentical hormones?

Bioidentical hormones are plant-based compounds specifically formulated to match the molecular structure of human hormones. Synthetics, however, are engineered not to match the molecular structure of  human hormones in order to be patented.

Estrogen Replacement Therapy

Estrogen is an essential female sex hormone that begins to decline in the years preceding and during menopause. The signs and symptoms of estrogen loss are well-known. They include hot flashes, insomnia, irritability, mood swings, and diminished sexual interest. If a woman fails to restore estrogen levels at menopause, she significantly increases the risk of developing osteoporosis, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, and colon cancer.

Estrogen replacement aims to prevent these diseases and to relieve menopausal symptoms. A patient’s decision to start the therapy should be based on accurate medical information, and discussion of the scientific, evidence-based risks and benefits.

Consequences of estrogen deficiency

  • Memory weakness;
  • Hot flashes;
  • Urogenital atrophy;
  • Incontinence;
  • Sagging of skin and breasts;
  • Premature facial wrinkles;
  • Fatigue;
  • Depression and mood swings;
  • Decreased libido.
  • Sagging of skin and breasts;
  • Premature facial wrinkles;
  • Fatigue;
  • Depression and mood swings;
  • Decreased libido.

All of these deficiencies can be corrected by natural estrogen replacement.

Benefits of estrogen replacement

  • Protects against heart disease and stroke;
  • Prevents osteoporosis;
  • Prevents and lowers incidence of Alzheimer’s and senility;
  • Improves memory and concentration;
  • Protects against macular degeneration and cataracts;
  • Decreases total cholesterol and increases the proportion of HDL (good cholesterol);
  • Protects against vaginal atrophy, urinary incontinence, bladder problems, and urinary tract infections;
  • Prevents menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes;
  • Improves balance;
  • Prevents insomnia and improves the quality of sleep;
  • Prevents anxiety;
  • Enhances general health and vigor;
  • Improves muscle tone;
  • Reduces wrinkles;
  • Promotes stronger and shinier hair;
  • Promotes more enjoyable, satisfying sex after menopause.
  • Protects against heart disease and stroke;
  • Prevents osteoporosis;
  • Prevents and lowers incidence of Alzheimer’s and senility;
  • Improves memory and concentration;
  • Protects against macular degeneration and cataracts;
  • Decreases total cholesterol and increases the proportion of HDL (good cholesterol);
  • Protects against vaginal atrophy, urinary incontinence, bladder problems, and urinary tract infections;
  • Prevents menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes;
  • Improves balance;
  • Prevents insomnia and improves the quality of sleep;
  • Prevents anxiety;
  • Enhances general health and vigor;
  • Improves muscle tone;
  • Reduces wrinkles;
  • Promotes stronger and shinier hair;
  • Promotes more enjoyable, satisfying sex after menopause.

Female hormone replacement controversies

The recent World Health Initiative (WHI) study of 16,000 women has unfortunately muddled medical and popular understanding of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The study, purporting to show an increased incidence of heart disease, breast cancer and stroke following HRT, suggested that the risk associated with the therapy outweighed any benefit. However, the research did not use any human hormones, relying instead on Premarin (freeze-dried horse urine) and Provera (progestin, a proven toxic chemical), neither of which, needless to say, has ever been found naturally in any woman, at any age!

Furthermore, the link made by the study between hormone therapy and heart disease must be seen in the context of the sample population, which consisted mostly of women in their 60s and 70s with preexisting cardiovascular conditions.
WIt is regrettable that many women who might have benefited from hormone replacement have been steered away from it as a result of the WHI study.

Previous medical recommendations in favor of HRT had been based, in large part, on the Nurse Health Study, a 20-year monitoring of 120,000 women under age 55, which found that HRT was associated with significant reduction in cardiac events, as well as in total cardiovascular death. How could the WHI conclusions conflict so dramatically with these and result in a virtual flip-flop in the medical advice given to women?

The truth is that the findings of both studies were largely correct, but there was an important difference between the studies in the timing of the therapy. Women in the Nurse Health study generally began HRT within two years of menopause, whereas those in the WHI study did not start until ten years after menopause.

Estrogen is thought to protect against cardiovascular disease in pre menopausal women, but the risk for atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, begins to rise as estrogen levels decline after menopause. Strong evidence supports the use of HRT for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, but only if started before or soon after menopause and before there are any indications of atherosclerosis. Once cardiovascular disease has developed, HRT has no capacity to reverse the process and may actually disturb the plaque attached to artery walls, thereby increasing the risk of obstructive blood clots (thrombosis).

Testosterone in Women

Most of the research on testosterone replacement has focused on men. However, healthy women also have testosterone, in small amounts produced primarily in the ovaries. Testosterone levels tend to peak when a woman is ovulating, which increases libido (sex drive) for reproduction. The hormone appears to enhance the function of estrogen and progesterone, though women do not convert testosterone to estrogen as readily as men.

The majority of women begin to experience symptoms of testosterone deficiency after menopause, when levels generally decline by about 50%. Other factors contributing to the decline include childbirth, endometriosis, removal of the ovaries, depression, alcohol and antidepressant medications, and narcotic abuse.

Symptoms of testosterone deficiency in women

  • Decrease in libido, orgasms, and sexual fantasy;
  • Vaginal dryness and painful sexual intercourse;
  • Loss of lean muscle mass, flabbiness, and muscular weakness;
  • Bone loss, risk of arthritis and osteoporosis;
  • Depression and memory loss;
  • Cardiovascular disease and stroke;
  • Urinary incontinence and other bladder symptoms

Do Men Need Hormones Too? 

Most people automatically think of menopausal women when they hear the phrase, “hormone replacement therapy.”  But men need hormones, too. Every man experiences a gradual decline in hormone production as he ages.  Beginning at age of 30, his body manufactures less and less testosterone. He loses approximately 1–2 percent per year until sometime between 40 and 55, his testosterone levels drop dramatically and signal the onset of andropause—the medical term for the male equivalent of menopause.

As a result of the decrease in testosterone,  a man will start losing muscle mass and feels sluggish, depressed and irritable. Yet most men believe they have to tough out these symptoms as part of “getting older.”

In recent years, hormonal needs for men have received national media attention. Most treatments, in recent years,  have been expensive, required daily consumption, and  caused an initial surge in testosterone followed by rapid decline  leading  to many unpleasant side-effects.

Tell me more about testosterone…

Testosterone is essential to a man’s well-being. Without it, fatigue, anxiety, depression, loss of mental clarity and libido can occur.  Lack of proper levels of testosterone may also lead to prostate problems, loss of muscle tone and mass and the potential to develop osteoporosis.

Testosterone in Men

Testosterone is a primary male sex hormone secreted by the adrenal glands (small gland on top of the kidneys) and the testes. It is responsible for male sexual development and is critical in maintaining erectile function, libido (sex drive), normal energy level, mood, muscle-building, and the burning of fat. It also supports immune function, bone density, skin tone, and a broad range of other physiological elements.

Testosterone levels begin to decline when a man is in his mid- to late 30s, and by the age of 80 are only 20% of what they were in his youth. While total testosterone does not drop drastically, free testosterone, which is the biologically active form, does decline precipitously with age. Free testosterone makes up about 2-3% of the total amount secreted. Currently, more than 5 million men in the United States suffer from the effects of low testosterone.

Male menopause (andropause)

Andropause, also known as male androgen deficiency syndrome, is the male equivalent of menopause and has similar symptoms. It results from diminished levels of testosterone and a corresponding relative increase in estrogen. Because the drop in testosterone is more gradual than that of estrogen in the female, the symptoms of andropause appear more slowly, with a fall in overall energy, thinning bones, loss of muscle mass, increased body fat, depression, and impaired sexual function.

Symptoms associated with low testosterone

  • Decreased libido and erectile capacity;
  • Lack of focus, forgetfulness, mental dullness;
  • Unexplained depression and mood swings;
  • Weight gain;
  • Loss of lean body mass, flabbiness, muscular weakness;
  • Development of arthritis and osteoporosis;
  • Rises in blood pressure and blood sugar;
  • Changes in sleep patterns, fatigue;
  • Hot flashes.

Benefits of testosterone replacement

  • Enhances spontaneity and fullness of erection;
  • Boosts libido and sexual fantasy;
  • Increases muscle mass and decreases abdominal fat;
  • Maintains ideal body weight;
  • Enhances clarity of thought and mood;
  • Reduces formation of beta amyloid protein, a key factor in Alzheimer’s disease;
  • Lowers all cardiovascular risk factors, decreases LDL (bad cholesterol) and raises HDL (good cholesterol);
  • Improves angina (cardiac-related chest pain);
  • Prevents blood clot formation, lowering the risk of stroke;
  • Prevents osteoporosis by promoting new bone formation.

Omeed Sani, M.D. at Health and Beauty Physicians has helped countless men and women in Santa Clara County, California to improve their sense of wellbeing and health with Bioidentical Hormone Pellet Therapy. To learn more about receiving a customized Hormone Pellet Therapy treatment plan, contact Santa Clara County Hormone Pellet Therapy Doctor Omeed Sani, M.D. at Health and Beauty Physicians in Sunnyvale, California today to schedule a free consultation!